Korea Bathcul Spring & Summer Best Hit Item (August)

Posted by Flipper Museum On August - 1 - 2011Comments Off on Korea Bathcul Spring & Summer Best Hit Item (August)

Spring & Summer Best Hit Item (1 August – 31 August 2011), for more information please log on to http://www.bathcul.com/ .

Korea Bathcul Spring & Summer Best Hit Item (July)

Posted by Flipper Museum On July - 1 - 2011Comments Off on Korea Bathcul Spring & Summer Best Hit Item (July)

Korea Bathcul Spring & Summer Best Hit Item (1 July – 31 July 2011), for more information please log on to http://www.bathcul.com/.

Limited Edition: Beanie Bunny celebrates the year 2011 in Korea!

Posted by Flipper Museum On January - 25 - 2011Comments Off on Limited Edition: Beanie Bunny celebrates the year 2011 in Korea!

“People with the zodiac sign of the rabbit are said to have a mild disposition, a warm heart, an excellent eye for good aesthetics, and the spirit of an artist.”

Once again, Flipper is proud to present the Animo Jr. Limited Edition toothbrush holder – Beanie Bunny, the little grey furry rabbit. We are happy to have it as a one of our limited edition toothbrush holder amongst our other adorable animals to celebrate the year of the Rabbit. This is an exclusive project with our Korea partner, Bathcul and available in Korea only. Please check out their online store now: www.bathcul.com

Quote from Korea Tourism Organization, the year of “Sinmyo,” or “the year of the rabbit.” Zodiac signs (called “띠” / “tti” in Korean) are based on the lunar year, not the calendar year, so the first day of the new zodiac year doesn’t occur until February 3rd (January 1st by the lunar year). Zodiac signs are given to people based on their year of birth and it has been widely believed that people have different personalities and luck depending on their sign.

Source: http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/

Let’s listen to Lee Hyo-won from koreatimes.co.kr to tells us about the myths and tales

Interestingly, the furry animal is associated with, of all things, the liver. Local legend has it that rabbit liver nourished Kim Chun-chu, a 7th-century king of the Silla Kingdom (57 B.C.-935 A.D.), back to life after he was wounded on a mission to save his kingdom.

In another popular folktale, the rabbit was kidnapped by a sea turtle to present his liver before the ill Dragon King of the Sea, but the clever creature managed to escape by lying that he left his liver on land and thus needed to go fetch it.

The animal also symbolizes the moon. The age-old tale of rabbits pounding the elixir of life in a large mortar beneath a laurel tree on the moon dates as far back as the 3rd century B.C. in Qin-era China. Many relics from the period include artworks and figurines featuring the rabbit.

The iconicism of the moon rabbit can be found in ancient Korea as well. As much as rabbits are known for giving birth to numerous offspring, many folk paintings from the Joseon Kingdom (1392-1910) feature a pair of rabbits symbolizing intimate and harmonious relationships. A moon and/or laurel tree can often be found in the background.

Even today, a longtime favorite ice cream treat is Chaltteok Ice, featuring rabbits pestling rice cakes on the moon.

But the rabbit’s association with the moon, which symbolizes yin, isn’t completely positive.

Some old customs advise against inviting visitors into the house or using wooden plates and bowls on “sangmyoil,” the first rabbit day of the lunar rabbit year. Women were also forbidden from leaving the house and the practice continues to this day in some parts of Gyeonggi Province.

Source: http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/